Sunday, May 20, 2007

Ethiopian Food, Take 2

We just did this recently, and it was good but it didn't come out exactly as planned so it was time for round two. Again I made Split Pea Alecha from Vegan Lunch Box and Gomen. I used less water for the split peas this time so they came out nice and thick, suitable for eating with our injera.

Yup, I also made injera this time, having found teff flour at Whole Foods (thanks to a tip from our last post). The Vegan Lunch Box injera recipe is not completely authentic but it was easy to make and very tasty. And relatively close to what we've had in Ethiopian restaurants. I've read that traditionally injera is made by letting the batter ferment for a couple of days to give it a bit of a tangy flavor. Maybe one day I'll play around with the recipe and try using my sourdough starter instead of commercial yeast. (Incidentally, the teff flour we got was from Bob's Red Mill so if you can't find any in your town you can order it on-line.)

11 comments:

serene said...

Both of my attempts at Injera were unbearably bitter. I can't wait to try this one. I *love* injera!

Megan the Vegan said...

wow - you made your own injera...incredible!

Cherie said...

That looks so good. I tried the injera with teff flour and using the method of fermentation. What method did you use? Soda water? I am going to buy the lunchbox book soon.

Chris said...

This injera recipe was pretty simple really. It's a cup of teff flour, a cup of all purpose flour and a half tsp. salt mixed with 2 cups water and 1 tsp. yeast. You let it sit for an hour then cook it in a skillet almost like a crepe. Like I said, not completely authentic but still pretty good.

Anonymous said...

help! what we do we do about this?? this is the #4 most emailed story in the New York Times, and it's titled "Death by Veganism"

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/05/21/opinion/21planck.html

Cherie said...

Thank you so much! I will try it that way. :) Did you use cast-iron? I don't even have a nonstick anymore. I hope cast-iron works well.

Chris said...

Cherie - I used a 10" non-stick skillet but I'm sure a well-seasoned cast iron one would work fine.

anonymous - there's a good discussion on this piece of crap op-ed on the PPK boards here (and elsewhere in vegan web-dom too I'm sure).

bazu said...

beautiful. I aspire to make my own injera one day. It just seems incredibly advanced, not to mention delicious and satisfying.

aTxVegn said...

That looks incredible! Outstanding job!

Chris said...

Thanks atxvegn!

I was concerned it would be difficult too Bazu but you should give it a try, it's really pretty easy. If you can make bread and crepes you can do this - in fact it's easier than either one of those.

Cherie said...

So I made the injera and it worked well for some of the batter but not for others. The interesting thing was that at first, it seemed too thick, so I added water and got two big pieces that turned out well, but then after those ones and not changing the batter, the next few either fell apart or didn't cook. It's very touchy stuff, huh?! I don't care because I found the best masir wat EVER, better than any restaurant I've had (the recipe is on my blog).